An analysis of sexism in the woman warrior a book by maxine hong kingston

She grew up confused by the ideas and behavior of her parents and the villagers who had settled in Stockton, California, who saw their American-born children as very strange - not really Chinese. Her parents hoped one day to return the whole family 4. Her parents hoped one day to return the whole family to China - yet the China they had left had since changed.

An analysis of sexism in the woman warrior a book by maxine hong kingston

The following entry provides analysis and criticism of The Woman Warrior. A highly acclaimed memoirist, Kingston integrates autobiographical elements with Asian legend and fictionalized history to delineate cultural conflicts confronting Americans of Chinese descent.

Frequently studied in a variety of academic disciplines, her works bridge two civilizations in their examination of social and familial bonds from ancient China to contemporary California.

As an American-born daughter of stern immigrant parents, Kingston relates the anxiety that often results from clashes between radically different cultural sensibilities. Her exotic, myth-laden narratives are informed by several sources: From these foundations, Kingston forms epic chronicles of the Chinese immigrant experience that are esteemed for their accurate and disturbing illumination of such social patterns as Asian cultural misogyny and American institutional racism.

Her autobiography, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts, which won the general nonfiction award from the National Book Critics Circle, is a chronicle of Kingston's confrontation with her dual heritage.

Plot and Major Characters The Woman Warrior is a personal, unconventional work that seeks to reconcile Eastern and Western conceptions of female identity. Kingston eschews chronological plot and standard nonfiction techniques in her memoir, synthesizing ancient myth and imaginative biography to present a kaleidoscopic vision of female character.

In The Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston recalls a girlhood spent in her parents’ laundry in a California city, in American and Chinese schools, and in the enchanting fables and fantasies of. Maxine Hong Kingston is the author of The Woman Warrior, China Men, and The Fifth Book of Peace, among other works. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the presidentially conferred National. Kingston tells the story of a kooky woman who lives there, who goes down to the river to get some water with a cup. She dances around in the open space. Brave Orchid just watches as the other cave dwellers accuse her of being a spy and stone her to death.

The narrative begins with Kingston's mother's brief caveat concerning No Name Woman, young Maxine's paternal aunt, whose disrepute has rendered her unmentionable. Affirming traditional attitudes, Maxine's mother, Brave Orchid, describes such practices as foot-binding and the sale of girls as slaves, and she threatens Maxine with servitude and an arranged marriage to a retarded neighborhood boy.

Subsequent chapters, however, provide sharp contrast to these bleak visions, for Brave Orchid also recites the colorful legend of Fa Mu Lan, the woman warrior who wielded a sword to defend her hamlet.

Kingston then describes Brave Orchid's own incongruent character; independent enough to become one of rural China's few female doctors, she returned to her customary submissive role upon joining her husband in America.

SparkNotes: The Woman Warrior: Important Quotations Explained

The book is divided into five sections; Kingston's character is central to the second and fifth sections, in each instance identifying herself with Fa Mu Lan.

Major Themes The Woman Warrior was described by Paul Gray as "drenched in alienation," and is also characterized by ambiguity, because, as Gray pointed out, it "haunts a region somewhere between autobiography and fiction.

The book's subtitle, Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts, alludes to the ghosts that abounded in Kingston's childhood—not only the ghosts of her ancestors that peopled her mother's stories, but the Americans who, because they were "foreigners," were considered "ghosts" by her mother.

Jane Kramer commented that young Maxine, "in a country full of ghosts, is already a half-ghost to her mother. Diane Johnson remarked that "messages which for Western girls have been confusingly obscured by the Victorian pretense of woman worship are in the Chinese tradition elevated to epigram: Her memoir has been praised as a masterfully written, exceptional testament to the rich heritage that is often lost or forgotten by emigrants and their children after they settle in the United States and must adapt to American society.

The Woman Warrior aroused some controversy among critics who maintained that Kingston was presenting a false impression of Chinese culture and traditions.

Critics particularly took issue with Kingston's depiction of Chinese men and society in general as misogynist and what they deemed her loose, inaccurate renderings of Chinese myths, which, they argue, she presents as fact. Critics also faulted Kingston for taking liberties with the traditional genre of autobiography, including fictional elements in her narrative that are offered as fact.

Other critics defended Kingston's narrative, and argued that it was not the author who classified her work as nonfiction. William McPherson called The Woman Warrior "a strange, sometimes savagely terrifying and, in the literal sense, wonderful story of growing up caught between two highly sophisticated and utterly alien cultures, both vivid, often menacing and equally mysterious.

Its sources are dream and memory, myth and desire. Its crises are crises of a heart in exile from roots that terrorize and bind it.Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts was published 30 years ago last fall, at a time when Chinese-Americans evoked few associations in the American.

Although The Woman Warrior is a serious treatment of a Chinese-American woman's assimilation into a foreign culture, many episodes in the book are humorous.

Discuss one event in the book . Maxine Hong Kingston is the author of The Woman Warrior, China Men, and The Fifth Book of Peace, among other works. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the presidentially conferred National.

Maxine Hong Kingston (Chinese: 湯婷婷; born Maxine Ting Ting Hong; October 27, ) is a Chinese American author and Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, where she graduated with a BA in English in Kingston has written three novels and several works of non-fiction about the experiences of Chinese Americans.

An analysis of sexism in the woman warrior a book by maxine hong kingston

Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior is a widely read memoir first published in The fancifully narrated postmodern autobiography is regarded as an important feminist work. Genre-Bending Feminist Memoir. The full title of the book is The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts.

The narrator, a representation of Maxine Hong Kingston, hears stories of her Chinese heritage told by . The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts is a book written by Chinese American author Maxine Hong Kingston and published by Alfred A.

An analysis of sexism in the woman warrior a book by maxine hong kingston

Knopf in The book blends autobiography with what Kingston purports to be old Chinese folktales, although several scholars have questioned the accuracy and authenticity of these folktales.

SparkNotes: The Woman Warrior: Plot Overview